How to Convert Watts to Amps - Jackery Australia

How to Convert Watts to Amps

How to Convert Watts to Amps

Amps and watts are two different units used to measure electrical power. Watts measure the energy consumed by electrical appliances, while amps measure the amount of current flowing through the electrical circuit.

Jackery Explorer Portable Power Stations have a higher wattage and amperage rating. The higher amp rating ensures you can power multiple devices simultaneously. Similarly, the higher wattage ensures the power station can charge appliances for long hours.

Jackery Explorer 2000 Pro Power Station has a higher battery capacity of 2160Wh. It has multiple ports, ensuring you can power multiple indoor and outdoor appliances. This guide will reveal how to convert watts to amps using different methods.

- Quick AC charging in 2 hours

- Features a battery capacity of 2160Wh

- Powers up to 8 devices simultaneously

- All-round safety with industry-leading BMS technology

- Powers nearly 96% of your home or outdoor appliances

Jackery Explorer 2000 Plus


What Is Watts to Amps

Watts measure electrical power or the energy generated by the amps and volts. The higher the watts are, the more power the electrical appliance consumes.

Also called volt-amps, this unit of electrical measurement is generally used in AC power circuits. For instance, if a microwave has more wattage, it will cook food faster.

Amps, also known as amperes, measure the number of electrons flowing past a certain point per second. A common analogy that describes amps working is a garden hose.

The more gallons of water flow through the hose per minute, the stronger the current. Amps are also used to measure the capacity of electric batteries. For instance, if a battery has higher amps, more electrons flow through the circuit and charge appliances faster.

The amps and watts are related to each other as follows:

Formula: Watts = Amps × Volts

AC Power System: Alternating current is the flow of charge that changes direction periodically. Homes and offices usually have AC power, as the electricity can easily flow long distances. An example of AC is the wall charger of your electronic devices.

DC Power System: DC or direct current is the electric current that flows only in a single direction. Some examples of DC power systems include fuel cells, photovoltaic (solar) cells, and batteries.

In the three-phase supply system, the lower voltage or voltage between a phase and neutral is generally referred to as the line to neutral voltage. In contrast, the higher voltage or voltage between two phases is the line-to-line voltage.


How to Convert Watts to Amps

Converting watts to amps becomes more critical when choosing any solar-powered system for your home. Below are the four methods to quickly convert ampere to wattage.
Method 1: Fixed Voltage
In this method, the voltage value is generally fixed to 120V or 240V. The simple formula to convert watts to amps is:
Amps = Watts ÷ Voltage
Example: If a device has a power rating of 1000W and is operating at a fixed voltage of 120V, then the current will be:
Amps = 1000W ÷ 120V = 8.33A
Similarly, if the device's power rating is 1000W, but it is operating at 240V, the current drawn will be:
Amps = 1000W ÷ 240V = 4.16V
Method 2: DC Voltage
If the voltage changes from fixed to DC, the formula to convert watts to amps remains the same. The current in amps equals the power in watts divided by voltage.
Amps = Watts ÷ Voltage
Example: Suppose you want to calculate the current drawn by a microwave that consumes 1000W of electricity at 50V.
Amps = 1000W ÷ 50V = 20A
Method 3: Single-Phase AC Voltage
The phase current in amps is equivalent to power in watts, divided by the power factor times the RMS voltage.
I (A) = P (W) ÷ [PF × V (V)]
The power factor of resistive impedance load is equivalent to 1.
Example:
P = 3000W, V = 110V, PF = 0.8
I (A) = P (W) ÷ [PF × V (V)] = 3000W ÷ [0.8 × 110V] = 34A.
Method 4: Three-Phase AC Voltage
There are two methods to calculate the amps in a three-phase AC voltage system: line-to-line and line-to-neutral.
Line-to-Line Voltage: The phase current equals power divided by the square of three times the power factor times the line-to-line RMS voltage.
I (A) = P (W) ÷ [√3 × PF × V (V)]
Example: If you want to calculate the amps with 1000W, 0.8 PF, and a line-to-line RMS voltage of 20V.
I (A) = 1000W ÷ [√3 × 0.8 × 20V] = 36.1A
Line-to-Neutral Voltage: The phase current equals power divided by 3 times the power factor times the line-to-neutral RMS voltage.
I (A) = P (W) ÷ 3 × PF × V (V)
Example: Let's say you want to calculate the amps of a three-phase electric system with 1000W of power, 0.8 PF, and a voltage of 5V.
I (A) = 1000W ÷ [3 × 0.8 × 5V] = 83.3A
Typical Power Factor
The typical power factor is the ratio of useful energy to supplied energy and depends on the type of electrical load. Generally, a power factor of 1 is ideal as all the power is converted to useful work. However, achieving a power factor of 1 is less practical.

Device

Typical power factor

Resistive load

1

Fluorescent lamp

0.95

Incandescent lamp

1

Induction motor full load

0.85

Induction motor no load

0.35

Resistive oven

1

Synchronous motor

0.9

Why Convert Watts to Amps?

Watts and amps measure the electric power, but they are different. While watts measure how much electric energy is consumed, the amps measure its flow.
Understanding the relationship between watts and amps can help you determine the size of wire required to connect an electrical appliance to a power source. In addition, it lets you determine the maximum current a particular circuit can handle.
Watts to Amps Conversion Table

Watts

Amps @ 12V

Amps @ 24V

Amps @ 48V

10W

0.83A

0.42A

0.21A

20W

1.67A

0.83A

0.42A

30W

2.5A

1.25A

0.63A

40W

3.33A

1.67A

0.83A

50W

4.17A

2.08A

1.04A

60W

5A

2.5A

1.25A

70W

5.83A

2.92A

1.46A

80W

6.67A

3.33A

1.67A

90W

7.5A

3.75A

1.88A

100W

8.33A

4.17A

2.08A

Watts

Amps @ 120V

Amps @ 220V

Amps @ 240V

100W

0.83A

0.45A

0.42A

200W

1.67A

0.91A

0.83A

300W

2.5A

1.36A

1.25A

400W

3.33A

1.82A

1.67A

500W

4.17A

2.27A

2.08A

600W

5A

2.73A

2.5A

700W

5.83A

3.18A

2.92A

800W

6.67A

3.64A

3.33A

900W

7.5A

4.09A

3.75A

1000W

8.33A

4.55A

4.17A


How to Convert Amps to Watts

Converting amps to watts is easy whether you're dealing with alternating or direct current. Let's see how to convert amps to watts with some common examples.
Method 1: Fixed Voltage
If you want to convert amperage to wattage at a fixed voltage, follow the formula below.
The power in watts is equal to the current in amps multiplied by voltage in volts.
P (W) = I (A) × V (V)
Example: Let's say you want to convert 12 amperes to wattage at a fixed voltage of 120V.
P = 12A × 120V = 1440W
Method 2: DC Voltage
The formula to convert amps to watts for DC circuits is:
P (W) = I (A) × V (V)
Example: Let's say you want to calculate the DC power required to charge your laptop with a charger with an output rating of 16.5V and 3.65A.
P (W) = 3.65A × 16.5V = 60.2W
Method 3: AC Voltage
In the AC three-phase system, there are two ways to convert amps to watts.
Line-to-Line Voltage: The power is equal to current times the square root of 3 times the power factor times the line-to-line RMS voltage.
P (W) = √3 × PF × I (A) × V
Line-to-Neutral Voltage: The power is equal to current times the square root of 3 times the power factor times the line-to-neutral RMS voltage.
P (W) = √3 × PF × I (A) × V
Example: Let's say you want to know the wattage requirement of a system that draws a current of 20A at a voltage of 15V. In this case, the PF is 0.8.
P (W) = √3 × 0.8 × 20A × 15V = 415W

Why Convert Amps to Watts?

When dealing with a solar-powered system, you must convert amps to watts. This conversion will help you understand how much watts your appliances are consuming. In addition, it reveals whether your solar system – especially the inverter – can handle the total expected wattage.
Amps to Watts Conversion Tables

Amps

Watts @ 12 V

Watts @ 24 V

Watts @ 48V

1A

12W

24W

48W

2A

24W

48W

96W

3A

36W

72W

144W

4A

48W

96W

192W

5A

60W

120W

240W

6A

72W

144W

288W

7A

84W

168W

336W

8A

96W

192W

384W

9A

108W

216W

432W

10A

120W

240W

480W

Amps

Watts @ 120 V

Watts @ 220 V

Watts @ 240V

1A

120W

220W

240W

2A

240W

440W

480W

3A

360W

660W

720W

4A

480W

880W

960W

5A

600W

1100W

1200W

6A

720W

1320W

1440W

7A

840W

1540W

1680W

8A

960W

1760W

1920W

9A

1080W

1980W

2160W

10A

1200W

2200W

2400W


Jackery Power Stations Explained

Identifying the watts and amps of a power station lets you confirm the battery's compatibility with the home or outdoor appliances. The higher the watts of the power station, the longer it can supply electricity to the devices.
Jackery Explorer Power Stations are battery-powered inverter generators that can power various appliances. From 500W to 3000W, Jackery provides portable power stations for different scenarios and can power 99% of devices efficiently.
It is portable and lightweight, measuring precisely the same dimensions as a basketball, making it simple to transport. The SolarSaga 100W solar panel is foldable, mobile, and light at 4.69 kilograms; it even has an easy-carry handle. A quiet home generator will not disrupt your slumber, unlike conventional gas generators. The 500 dB output of the Solar Generator makes it an exceptionally silent generator for camping.
Jackery Explorer 500 Power Station
The fully-compatible lithium-ion battery has a capacity of 1002Wh that can charge 93% of home or outdoor appliances. It weighs only 25.4 lbs, making this power station a portable charging solution for outdoor activities.
Jackery Explorer 1000 Power Station
Featuring a 2160Wh battery and offering output power of 2200W, the Jackery Explorer 2000 Pro Portable Power Station can recharge up to eight electrical devices simultaneously. It can last up to 10 years, assuming you use the power station twice weekly.
Jackery Explorer 2000 Power Station

PAGE CONTENTS

New Arrival

Hurry up! Sale ends once the timer hits zero

00Days
00Hrs
00Mins
00Secs


Watts to Amps FAQs

1. How many amps are 4000 watts at 120V?

If you have watts and volts of an electrical circuit, you can easily calculate the amps.

Amps = Watts ÷ Volts = 4000W ÷ 120V = 33.33A

That means 4000 watts, when operating at a voltage of 120 volts, is generally equal to 33.33 amperes.

2. How to convert watts to volts?

Volt is the measurement of force or pressure required to ensure the electric current can easily flow through the wire.

Smaller home appliances like light bulbs, computers, etc., operate at 120V, whereas larger appliances like refrigerators, washing machines, etc., operate at 240V.

You'll need to know the amperage value to convert watts to volts or volts to watts.

Formula: Volts = Watts ÷ Amps

Here are a few common watts-to-volts conversions with a fixed current of 1 amp.

Watts (W)

Amps (A)

Volts (V)

How many volts in 1 watt?

1A

1 volt

How many volts in 2 watt?

1A

2 volt

How many volts in 10 watt?

1A

10 volt

How many volts in 20 watt?

1A

20 volt

How many volts in 50 watt?

1A

50 volt

How many volts in 100 watt?

1A

100 volt

How many volts in 200 watt?

1A

200 volt

How many volts in 500 watt?

1A

500 volt

How many volts in 1000watt?

1A

1000 volt

3. What are the relations of amps, watts, and volts?

Ohm's Wheel Law is one of the simplest ways to understand the relation of amps, watts, and volts. Let's say you want to install a 2000 watts window air conditioner at your home. Since the AC is a large and power-sensitive home appliance, it generally requires 240 volts. Now that we have the watts and volts, you can calculate the current using the formula:

Amps (I) = Watts (W) ÷ Volts (V) = 2000W ÷ 240V = 8.33A.


Final Thoughts

Understanding how to convert watts to amps and vice versa may seem complex at first glance. However, it's pretty simple once you clear the basics and understand their relationship.

Basic knowledge of watts, amps, and volts will help you choose the best power station or solar generator to charge your home or outdoor appliances.

Jackery Explorer Portable Power Stations feature large battery capacities ranging from 293Wh to 3024Wh. Depending on how many appliances you want to charge or for how long, you can invest in the right size power station.


Best-selling Jackery Portable Power Stations

Sale Off
Jackery Explorer 1000 Pro Portable Power Station
$1,999.00$1,699.00
Sale Off
Jackery Explorer 500 Portable Power Station
$1,059.00$999.00

new-customer-close
Get My Gift